updated : 2020/04/27
22 photos
011 Liverpool St - Norwich

011 Liverpool St - Norwich

The main line from London Liverpool St to Norwich was the Great Eastern Railway's premier route and has been operated by a wide variety of motive power over the years. Recently it was notable for retaining locomotive haulage with class 90 electrics long after express passenger services elsewhere had gone over to multiple units. There is no shortage of EMUs on shorter distance services for those who like such things.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
14 photos
015 Norwich - Gt Yarmouth and Lowestoft

015 Norwich - Gt Yarmouth and Lowestoft

The 'Wherry Lines' running east from Norwich to the coastal towns of Great Yarmouth and Lowestoft are operated by the Greater Anglia franchise. A shortage of DMUs led the hire of class 37s and coaches from DRS to operate a number of services on the route until replaced by new bi-mode MUs in late 2019. The semaphore signalling was replaced about the same time.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
39 photos
026 East Coast Main Line

026 East Coast Main Line

By late 1981 the Deltics were working out their last miles on secondary and overnight passengers on the East Coast Main Line. Withdrawal of the remaining members of the class was scheduled for the end of the year. Most of these pictures were taken during November and December 1981 as the end approached.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
49 photos
029 Barnetby Area

029 Barnetby Area

Barnetby, in north Lincolnshire, is a busy spot for freight trains, handling large volumes of coal, oil, iron ore and biomass from the ports of Immingham and Grimsby. The semaphore signals (sadly now gone) and some attractive locations nearby add to the interest.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
5 photos
047 Water Orton - Leicester - Peterborough

047 Water Orton - Leicester - Peterborough

This route meanders across the Midlands from east to west, linking Birmingham with Nuneaton on the WCML, Leicester on the MML and Peterborough on the ECML. Freight traffic on the route has increased significantly following enhancements to the loading gauge that permit more container trains to use the line en-route to Felixtowe.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
15 photos
053 Midland Main Line

053 Midland Main Line

The Midland Main Line from St Pancras to Sheffield via Derby, Toton or Nottingham is relatively quiet compared to the East and West Coast routes but carries significant volumes of freight, particularly north of Leicester. Electrification only extends as far as Kettering and there are some attractive locations north of there.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
12 photos
054 Stenson Jn - Sheet Stores Jn

054 Stenson Jn - Sheet Stores Jn

This short section of line runs from Stenson Junction, south of Derby on the Birmingham line, to Sheet Stores Junction, south-east of Derby on the route to Trent Junction, where lines head north to Toton, east to Nottingham and south towards Leicester and London. The line sees no regular passenger traffic but is used by a fair number of freights.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
18 photos
057 Birmingham - Derby

057 Birmingham - Derby

The line from Birmingham to Derby has long been an important link in the North-East to South-West route, linking Yorkshire and the East Midlands with the West Midlands, South Wales and the South West. It continues to be busy with passenger traffic and sees a significant volume of freight.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
24 photos
065 Milton Keynes - Stafford

065 Milton Keynes - Stafford

The electrified West Coast Main Line from Milton Keynes north to Rugby and along the Trent Valley to Stafford is one of the country's busiest main lines with freights, stopping passengers and high-speed services all vying for the available capacity. The gallery includes photos taken on the Northampton Loop, effectively part of the WCML.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
20 photos
065 Carlisle - Glasgow

065 Carlisle - Glasgow

This is the former Caledonian Railway main line over Beattock Summit, the northern section of the Euston - Glasgow West Coast Main Line. The line is busier now than it has ever been. Most traffic is operated by various types of EMU but there is some freight, most of it diesel hauled despite the line being electrified for over 40 years.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
19 photos
071 Aynho Jn - Leamington - Coventry

071 Aynho Jn - Leamington - Coventry

The line from Aynho Junction to Leamington funnels traffic from London and the South Coast towards the Midlands. The line runs through attractive rural scenery and has seen significant growth in both passenger and freight traffic in recent years. Of particular note are the growth in container and automotive traffic serving Southampton and Chiltern's successful development of the Marylebone - Birmingham route for passengers.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
19 photos
078 Peak District

078 Peak District

This gallery covers the Hope Valley line between Sheffield and Manchester together with the freight lines from Chinley to Buxton and on to Dowlow. The freight lines, serving quarries at Peak Forest, Tunstead and Dowlow, generate significant volumes of stone traffic and there are still semaphore signals at Peak Forest and Great Rocks Junction.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
78 photos
116 Didcot - Aynho Jn

116 Didcot - Aynho Jn

The Didcot - Aynho Junction line is part of a major route linking the Midlands with Reading, London and the south coast via Oxford, a major source of passenger traffic in its own right. In addition to frequent passenger trains, the line carries a significant volume of freight, mainly containers and cars.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/30
23 photos
122 Reading - Basingstoke

122 Reading - Basingstoke

The Reading - Basingstoke line is a short, double-track railway linking the aforementioned towns. Its true value is as part of the main route from the Midlands to the port of Southampton and south coast resorts such as Bournemouth and Poole. Freight traffic, mainly containers and cars, is heavy and there are also frequent local and long distance passenger trains.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
138 photos
125 Paddington - Reading

125 Paddington - Reading

The four track main line from Reading to Paddington was one of Britain’s busiest diesel worked routes, carrying frequent HSTs and DMUs from the West Country, South Wales, Berkshire and Oxfordshire into London. A growing volume of freight traffic includes container, steel and stone trains. It’s not the most scenic line in the country but there were some attractive locations between Reading and Maidenhead. Electrification had ruined all the good spots by late 2016.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
87 photos
125 Reading - Didcot

125 Reading - Didcot

The main line from London to the west of England and South Wales follows the Thames Valley through some attractive countryside between Reading and Didcot. The line is very busy but the number of loco hauled passenger workings has declined to zero over the years. Freight traffic is reasonably bouyant with container trains from the port of Southampton predominating. Most of these photos were taken in 2003 and between 2014 and 2015, before electrification spoiled all the good locations.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
24 photos
125 Didcot - Swindon

125 Didcot - Swindon

Brunel's Great Western Main Line leaves the Thames Valley at Didcot and strikes westwards, climbing gently all the way to Swindon, a town that owes its existence to the railway and an important junction on today's railway. These pictures were taken during the last weeks before electrification work ruined the best spots and show HSTs and freights.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/16
135 photos
135 Reading - Westbury

135 Reading - Westbury

The Berks and Hants line was built in the late 1840s and eventually formed part of the GWR's direct route from London to Taunton and beyond. It still handles expresses between London and the West of England and local trains as far as Bedwyn but the main interest is the stone traffic from the Mendips to the London area. This includes Britain's heaviest trains weighing up to 4800 tonnes and hauled by Class 59 diesels. Electrification has ruined some locations but many good spots remain west of Newbury.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
32 photos
148 Reading - Redhill

148 Reading - Redhill

The Reading - Redhill line was completed in 1849 and worked by the South Eastern Railway and then the Southern Railway from 1923. Despite being electrified at both ends and around Guildford in the middle, most of the line remains unelectrified with passenger services worked by Great Western DMUs. There is no regular freight traffic but the line is occasionally used as a diversionary route. Most of the pictures here were taken around Wokingham, where electric trains from Waterloo join the route to Reading.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
42 photos
149 Waterloo - Reading and branches

149 Waterloo - Reading and branches

The line from Waterloo to Reading, its branches to Windsor and Weybridge and the Hounslow loop are often referred to as the Windsor Lines. Services are predominantly focussed on commuter traffic to and from London and worked by South Western Railway EMUs, often running in 8 or 10 car formations. There is no regular freight traffic at the west end of the line but it does handle trains from the south-west running via Chertsey to reach Clapham Jn or the North London line.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
57 photos
158 Waterloo - Weymouth

158 Waterloo - Weymouth

This was one of the London & South Western Railway's principal main lines, linking London with the port of Southampton, and eventually extended to Bournemouth and Weymouth. The line is still important with frequent passenger trains, gradually becoming less frequent towards the west end. They're all EMUs and DMUs these days but the Basingstoke to Southampton section sees a lot of freight, particularly container and car trains serving Southampton Docks.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
11 photos
170 Victoria - East Croydon

170 Victoria - East Croydon

The 4-track main line between Victoria and East Croydon via Balham and Norbury is one of the county's busiest lines, feeding trains from London into a complex network of suburban lines, as well as the Brighton Main Line and routes to other Sussex and South Coast destinations. The line was electrified at 6.6kV AC using overhead equipment, prior to the grouping in 1923, then converted to 750V DC in the late 1920s. All passenger services are operated by EMUs and freight traffic mostly runs at night.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
12 photos
186 East Croydon - Brighton

186 East Croydon - Brighton

The core of the electrified Brighton Main Line runs from East Croydon, where the routes from London Bridge and Victoria converge, through the outer suburbs, under the North Downs and into the countryside, serving Gatwick Airport and several medium sized towns before reaching Brighton. The vast majority of traffic is worked by EMUs.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
7 photos
229 Glasgow - Dundee

229 Glasgow - Dundee

The line from Glasgow to Dundee via Stirling and Perth is the gateway from the Central Belt to the Highlands and the North East, carrying reasonable volumes of passenger traffic as well as a few freights. The line is now electrified as far as Dunblane but the most attractive scenery is further north and there are semaphore signals in places as well. As well as the inevitable DMUs, some passenger trains are worked by HSTs.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/12
152 photos
229 Dundee - Aberdeen

229 Dundee - Aberdeen

The line from Dundee north to Aberdeen runs close to the coast much of the way but turns inland in a few places, increasing the variety of locations. The line is fairly busy these days with 2 through passengers an hour and local services at each end as well. There are a few regular freights and the recent introduction of HSTs on some Glasgow and Edinburgh trains has added to the interest.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
4 photos
Bedlay Colliery

Bedlay Colliery

Bedlay Colliery in Lanarkshire was one of the last in Britain to use steam locomotives. Although I lived fairly close, Bedlay was a difficult place to get to by public transport and it was only at the very end that I got around to visiting the mine. Steam lasted until Bedlay closed in December 1981 and these pictures were taken in the last year of operation.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
19 photos
Birmingham Area

Birmingham Area

Birmingham is England's second city and one of the best connected rail-wise with fairly direct connections to most parts of the country. The city generates significant volumes of freight and passenger traffic and sees plenty more, passing through, en-route to somewhere else. As well as the main routes converging on New St and Snow Hill stations, there are a number of freight lines, allowing through freights to avoid the congested central area.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
13 photos
Edinburgh Area

Edinburgh Area

Edinburgh is one of Scotland's two great railway hubs, the other being Glasgow. The city's location at the north end of the ECML, at the east end of the busy central belt and as the destination of services from many of Scotland's major towns and cities, has ensured a wide variety of traction over the years. These days it's mainly EMUs and DMUs but there are still a handful of loco hauled passenger services.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
12 photos
Manchester Area

Manchester Area

Manchester has a longer involvement with railways than most places, being the eastern terminus of the world's first public railway. These pictures were taken on a day visit in 1982 and show a range of traction that seems very exotic today.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
126 photos
Reading Area

Reading Area

This gallery brings together photos taken within a radius of 3 miles of Reading station on the various lines radiating from this major junction. Reading is where routes from Paddington to the West Country and South Wales cross the important line from the Midlands to Southampton. Locations include Sonning Cutting and Southcote Junction, both now ruined by electrification.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
7 photos
class 31

class 31

One of BR's least inspiring but longest lived classes. The original Brush Type 2s were so successful they had to be re-engined after a few years. The rebuilds were heavy and underpowered but at least they were reliable and eventually saw service on most parts of the system. Most were withdrawn in the 1990s but three remained in service with Network Rail until 2015, almost 60 years after the class was introduced.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
19 photos
class 37

class 37

The Class 37 or English Electric Type 3 was arguably British Rail's most successful diesel design with some remaining in main line service for over 50 years and a number still working for freight operators today. The Class 37 was a go anywhere, do anything locomotive, equally at home on express passenger or local freight, anywhere from Caithness to Cornwall. They sounded good as well and still do.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
160 photos
class 43 HSTs

class 43 HSTs

The introduction of class 43 powered HST sets from the late 1970s revolutionised rail travel in the UK, bringing new levels of speed and comfort to a number of main lines that hadn't benefited from electrification. Almost forty years later they're still going strong on several major routes despite having been displaced from the ECML and GWML by IETs. See the High Speed Trains gallery for all types of high speed train including the class 180 Adelantes and class 220 and 221 Voyagers.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
36 photos
class 47/57

class 47/57

With 508 locos built, the class 47 was Britain's most numerous class of main line diesel and could be found on main line passenger and freight services almost everywhere from Aberdeen to Penzance and Holyhead to Norwich. Most have been withdrawn but around 30 remain in service with various operators and a similar number have been rebuilt with EMD 645 engines and reclassified as class 57.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
23 photos
class 55 Deltics

class 55 Deltics

Without doubt the most remarkable diesels ever to run on the BR system, the Deltics packed 3300 horsepower into a 99 ton loco, a power to weight ratio that remained unbeaten until the class 68 was introduced. After 20 years and millions of miles working 100mph expresses on the ECML they were worn out and slated for withdrawal at the end of 1981. These photos were taken during their final months.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
100 photos
class 59

class 59

Fifteen class 59s were built in 3 batches for 3 different private companies between 1986 and 1995. They were unusual at the time in being American built and privately owned. How things have changed! Foster Yeoman and ARC bought their locos for stone traffic from the Mendips to S.E. England while National Power's were intended for power station coal traffic in the north. After EWS acquired the N.P. locos they migrated south to join their sisters in the Mendips and are now operated by Freightliner.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
35 photos
class 60

class 60

These heavy freight locos were the last built for British Rail before privatisation with 100 entering service between 1989 and 1993. All passed to EWS and successors DBS but both operators appear to prefer class 66 and most of the class 60s have been in store for several years. Ten locos were sold to Colas Rail in 2014 and moved to GBRf in 2018. DC Rail also have a few..
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
253 photos
class 66

class 66

Although class 66s look almost identical to the class 59s, they're based on the next generation EMD design with a 710 series engine and various other enhancements. Over 450 are now in service with several different UK operators with DB Cargo and Freightliner having the largest fleets. The class has operated the vast majority of freight services on the UK network for the last decade.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
6 photos
class 67

class 67

The 30 Class 67 locos were ordered by EWS in the late 1990s for use on mail trains, replacing worn out Class 47s. The locos were built by Alstom but had much in common with the Class 66 including the same GM engine and generator. Since the loss of the mail contract in 2003, they have been used on freights, some passenger services, royal trains, special trains and test trains.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
9 photos
class 68

class 68

The Class 68 was built at the same Spanish plant as the Class 67s but is powered by a Caterpillar engine developing 3800hp, making the 68 Britain's most powerful diesel. All 34 locos are operated by DRS, with 22 sub-leased to passenger operators, Chiltern, Scotrail and TPE. The remaining locos operate in freight service for DRS.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
33 photos
class 70

class 70

After a decade when GM EMD products dominated the British freight scene, General Electric tried to get a share of the action with the class 70 introduced in 2008. So far Freightliner have taken 20 and Colas 17, with no new orders since 2015. The Class 70 is significantly more powerful than the class 66 but has failed to gain the same popularity with operators.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/12
11 photos
class 73

class 73

The Class 73 Electro-Diesels were originally designed to be 750V DC electric locomotives with a small 600hp diesel engine to enable them to access non-electrified sidings and work engineering trains when the power was switched off. For years they rarely strayed far from the Southern Region but that changed when GBRf had a number re-engined with 1600hp diesel engines. Some of these Class 73/9 rebuilds are now the regular power for the Caledonian Sleeper north of Edinburgh, while others remain in the south.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
17 photos
Class 90

Class 90

The fifty Class 90 locomotives were the last electrics built specifically for the WCML and produce a useful 5000hp. Fifteen Class 90s, previously with Virgin Trains, migrated to the Great Eastern to work Norwich - London expresses in 2004 and remained there until early 2020. Most of the remaining locos are operated by Freightliner and DB Cargo, predominantly on WCML freight services.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/16
6 photos
Class 150

Class 150

The Class 150 was the first of BR's 'Sprinter' DMUs, introduced to replace life-expired first generation DMUs in the mid 1980s. The two prototypes were 3-car sets but the remaining 135 sets were built as 2-car units, although some have since been temporarily reformed into 3-car sets. The whole class remains in use, operating local services for Northern, Great Western and Transport for Wales.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/12
24 photos
class 158-159

class 158-159

The 2-car class 158 DMUs were introduced in 1989 to replace loco hauled trains on major regional routes. They were soon found to have inadequate capacity and some of the later units were built with 3 coaches, while others were reformed into 3-car units. The 159s are very similar but were originally owned by Network South East rather than Regional Railways. Both classes are still in widespread use and can be seen across the network.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
63 photos
class 165-166

class 165-166

The Class 165 and 166 DMUs were introduced in 1990 and have operated local services on the Great Western and Chiltern routes west of London ever since. Electrification of the GWML led to many of GW's units moving to the Bristol area, including all the Class 166s. As DMUs go they're among the most attractive in use in the UK today with rounded fronts unspoilt by corridor connections.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/12
51 photos
class 168 & 170-172

class 168 & 170-172

Classes 168, 170, 171 and 172 are all developments of the Class 165 and 166 DMUs produced by BREL for British Rail and were built for numerous privatised operators by Bombardier in Derby since the late 1990s. Many are used on longer distance services such as Norwich - Birmingham and Glasgow - Aberdeen.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
15 photos
class 180

class 180

The 14 Class 180 high speed DMUs have had a chequered existence, entering service 18 months late and being plagued with reliability problems in their earlier years. Originally with First Great Western, the whole fleet was retired by 2009, only for 5 to re-enter service after refurbishment in 2012. Of the remainder 5 went to Grand Central and 4 to Hull Trains. By 2017, the GW units had also gone to Grand Central and the Hull trains sets are expected to transfer to East Midlands during 2020.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
7 photos
class 185

class 185

Class 185 can be thought of as Siemens offering for the same longer distance, 100mph DMU market as the Bomberdier Class 170s. 51 3-car Class 185s were built for TransPennine Express services and entered service in 2006. The units have worked most principal TPE services in northern England for over a decade and regularly visit Glasgow and Edinburgh as well. All 51 units are still with TPE as this is written.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
33 photos
class 220-222

class 220-222

Classes 220 to 222 are high speed DEMUs built by Bombardier between 2000 and 2005. In total 105 units were built in various configurations from 4 to 8 cars but some have since been reformed. They can be found on many services operated by CrossCountry, Virgin (now Avanti) West Coast and East Midlands Railway. The class 221s are able to tilt but this has been disabled on CrossCountry's units.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
5 photos
Class 320, 321, 322

Class 320, 321, 322

Classes 320, 321 and 322 are closely related EMUs built by BREL's York Works around 1990. The 34 3-car Class 320s are operated by ScotRail on local services around Glasgow. The 321s and 322s are 4-car units. Greater Anglia operates most of the class 321s on longer distance services, e.g. from Liverpool St to Ipswich, while Northern operate the 322s around Leeds.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
11 photos
Class 350

Class 350

The Class 350 4-car EMU is the dual voltage version of the Siemens Desiro UK, capable of running on 750V DC and 25kV AC systems, although some lack the DC collection equipment. They are closely related to the DC only Class 444 and 450 units. All are now allocated to the London NorthWestern franchise although TPE has retained a few until it's new trains are in traffic.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
16 photos
Class 375, 377, 379 & 387

Class 375, 377, 379 & 387

Classes 375, 377, 379 and 387 are all very similar versions of the Bombardier Electrostar EMU platform and are generally intended for outer suburban and medium distance services. Some are 25kV AC only, others 750V DC only and yet more are dual system. The class designation is no guide to the power system. Almost 500 units are in service with operators in SE England.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
9 photos
Class 390

Class 390

Virgin Trains introduced the Alstom built class 390 Pendolino fleet to the West Coast Main Line in the early 2000s. Along with a few Class 221 tilting DMUs, the 53 390s now work all services for the West Coast franchise. At the end of 2019, the franchise and the class 390s passed to Avanti West Coast, the successor to Virgin Trains, and the units can still be found on WCML services.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
15 photos
class 444

class 444

South Western Railway's 45 Class 444 5-car EMUs are part of the Siemens Desiro UK family, built at Wien-Simmering between 2002 and 2004. They are 750V DC units for 3rd rail operation and have a maximum speed of 100mph. The 444s are used on SWTs principal long distance services between London and Portsmouth, Poole and Weymouth.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
11 photos
class 450

class 450

South Western Railway's 127 Class 450 4-car EMUs are part of the Siemens Desiro UK family, built between 2003 and 2007. The 450s have much in common with the 350s and 444s but are designed for outer suburban service, with 3+2 seating in standard class and wider doors. That doesn't stop them being used on longer distance routes such as London to Portsmouth or Poole, sometimes in multiple with Class 444s. They are more commonly found on services to Basingstoke or Alton or on the Windsor lines.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
8 photos
Class 455-456

Class 455-456

137 Class 455 4-car 750V DC EMUs were built in the mid-1980s to replace older slam-door inner-suburban sets. The 24 Class 456 2-car units followed in 1991 and were the last trains built with conventional DC traction equipment. The 456s and 91 of the 455s are in service with South Western. The remaining 455s work for Southern.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/03
9 photos
Class 458

Class 458

The 30 Class 458 4 car EMUs were the first design ordered by a privatised operator and have spent most of their lives working services on the Windsor Lines from Waterloo. After just over 10 years in service they underwent a rebuild emerging as 36 Class 458.5 5 Car units after the incorporation of vehicles from the short lived Class 460 Gatwick Express units. They can still be found on Windsor Lines services, principally working between Waterloo and Reading.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/21
5 photos
Class 707

Class 707

In 2014 South West Trains' ordered 30 5-car Class 707 trains of the Siemens Desiro City design for services between Waterloo and Windsor or Weybridge via Staines, releasing Class 450s for other work. Before most of the units had entered service the new franchisee, SWR, announced that it would replace them with even newer units. In the meantime the 707s can be found on Windsor Lines services.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
31 photos
class 800 - 802

class 800 - 802

Classes 800 and 802 are bi-mode high-speed multiple units built by Hitachi for various British operators including LNER, GWR and TPE. Class 801 are similar but are intended only for use on electrified lines, although they do have a single 750HP diesel engine for emergency use. The first units entered service in 2017 with GWR and they have since become the predominant traction for both GWR and LNER.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
99 photos
classic diesels

classic diesels

This gallery contains pictures of diesel locomotives introduced before 1980, including later rebuilds such as the class 57s. These were the locos I grew up with, collected the numbers of as a teenager and cut my teeth on as a photographer.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
244 photos
High Speed Trains

High Speed Trains

Originally high speed trains meant HSTs, or InterCity 125s as they were sometimes known, but the category has expanded to include the InterCity 225s on the ECML, Pendolinos on the WCML and various types of high speed DMU such as Voyagers and Adelantes, not to mention the latest IETs. This gallery includes all high speed trains, i.e. those capable of 125mph or more. For classic HSTs without the modern rubbish see the class 43 HSTs gallery.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
31 photos
Bi-Mode MUs

Bi-Mode MUs

This category covers units with bi-mode capabilities, generally the ability to run as electric units on electrified lines and then switch to an alternative power source, such as diesel engines or batteries, elsewhere. The numbers of such units, almost unknown in the UK until recently, are set to increase as operators seek alternatives to straight diesel power and other bi or multi-mode configurations might emerge in the future.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
211 photos
DMUs

DMUs

DMUs have been a major part of the British Railway landscape since the modernisation plan units first appeared in the late 1950s. This gallery contains all forms of self-contained diesel passenger train except the classic HSTs, as their class 43 power cars are considered to be honorary locomotives.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
104 photos
EMUs

EMUs

EMUs have been used in Britain for over a century and, with the demise of locomotive hauled passenger trains and continuing electrification, will probably be the dominant form of traction in the current century. They come in many variants, designed for everything from urban mass transit to high-speed Inter City travel and carry a wide variety of liveries.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
435 photos
freight

freight

Freight traffic declined steadily through the British Rail years despite numerous initiatives to stem the tide, some of which were more successful than others. Happily things have got better since privatisation and today the freight scene looks healthier than I can remember. Most of the interesting classes have disappeared but at least multiple private operators have brought a good variety of liveries to liven up the scene.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/12
103 photos
loco hauled passenger

loco hauled passenger

The locomotive hauled passenger train is a real rarity in the UK these days but it wasn't always so. Many different loco classes worked passenger trains during the 1980s and 1990s and in the days before the internet, these trains were far easier to predict than freights, making them a natural target for photography. Passenger is loosely interpreted here and includes sleepers, parcels and mail trains as well as empty stock workings.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
66 photos
British Rail

British Rail

From nationalisation in 1948 to the completion of privatisation in 1997, the UK's main line railways were operated by British Railways, known from the late '60s as British Rail. This gallery includes pictures from the BR era and locos in BR liveries after privatisation.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/12
11 photos
Caledonian Sleeper

Caledonian Sleeper

Sleeper services between London and Scotland are operated under the Caledonian Sleeper banner by Serco, with GBRf supplying locomotives. Class 92s are now the normal power south of Glasgow and Edinburgh, with Class 73/9s working between Edinburgh and Aberdeen, Inverness and Fort William. New MkV coaches were introduced in 2019 replacing the MkII and MkIII stock seen in most of these pictures.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
22 photos
Chiltern Railways

Chiltern Railways

Chiltern railways operates passenger services from London's Marylebone terminus to the north-west suburbs and beyond. The line had been a bit of a backwater in BR days but Chiltern successfully improved and extended the service to the West Midlands, bringing competition to the London - Birmingham market. Services are mainly provided by DMUs, some of them unique to Chiltern, but loco haulage has returned on some trains in recent years.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
31 photos
Colas Rail

Colas Rail

Colas Rail is a French owned infrastructure maintenance company that has branched out into freight operations. The company has a mixed fleet of diesel locomotives including 5 class 66 and 17 class 70 that handle the majority of traffic between them. Many of the trains operated by Colas are departmental workings and test trains for Network Rail but they also handle commercial freight across the network.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
24 photos
CrossCountry

CrossCountry

The imaginatively named CrossCountry took over the Cross Country franchise from Virgin in late 2007 and inherited most of Virgin's fleet of Class 220 and 221 Voyager DMUs as well as a few HSTs. CrossCountry is an Arriva subsidiary, hence owned by DB, and operates trains on a variety of routes linking major towns and cities via Birmingham. Class 170 DMUs are used on some shorter routes.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
187 photos
DB Cargo

DB Cargo

EWS, the UKs largest freight operator by a considerable margin, was taken over by Deutsche Bahn in late 2007. Just over a year later, EWS and DB's other European freight operations were rebranded as DB Schenker Rail. In early 2016 DBS was renamed DB Cargo. Relatively few ex EWS locos have been repainted into the red DB livery so far.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/12
39 photos
DRS

DRS

Direct Rail Services was formed by BNFL to move nuclear flasks between power stations and the Sellafield reprocessing plant in Cumbria. It has since diversified into other freight markets and also hires locomotives and coaching stock to TOCs. DRS has a rather eclectic fleet with ex BR classes rubbing shoulders with the latest Class 68 diesels and Class 88 electro-diesels, and, inevitably, class 66s.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/12
8 photos
East Midlands Trains

East Midlands Trains

East Midlands Trains operated the Midland Main Line, local services in the East Midlands and longer distance trains linking the East Midlands to surrounding regions. The franchise changed hands in August 2019, becoming East Midlands Railway. Most trains are booked for DMUs of various types with MML services worked by Class 222s and HSTs.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
108 photos
EWS

EWS

US regional railroad Wisconsin Central took over 5 of the 6 freight companies formed when BR was privatised and merged them to form the English, Welsh and Scottish Railway in 1996. EWS was the UK's largest freight operator and was sold to DB in 2007 by Canadian National which had taken over Wisconsin Central.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
123 photos
Freightliner

Freightliner

BR's intermodal activities were privatised in 1996 and retained the Freightliner name. The company has since expanded to become the UK's second largest freight operator. The loco fleet consists largely of class 66 diesels but there are also locos of classes 70, 86 and 90. In 2015 Freightliner was bought by US regional operator Genesee & Wyoming and a few locos have recently received G&W's orange livery.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
45 photos
GB Railfreight

GB Railfreight

GB Railfreight is one of the new freight companies that have emerged since privatisation and currently operates a fleet of well over 100 locomotives from a variety of classes. Class 66 diesels predominate but locos of classes 60, 73 and 92 are also active and a small number of older diesels can also be found in use. GBRf operates a wide range of traffic all over the network, from departmental and aggregates workings to container trains and the Caledonian Sleeper.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
175 photos
Great Western

Great Western

Great Western Trains was one of the first privatised passenger franchises, created in 1996 to operate former WR InterCity services. It has since expanded to include many local services as well, including suburban services from Paddington and the Cardiff - Portsmouth route. Known for a while as First Great Western it has now adopted the name Great Western Railway with a matching green livery. GW has recently replaced most of its HSTs with new IET units.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
32 photos
Greater Anglia

Greater Anglia

The Greater Anglia franchise operates passenger services in East Anglia and on the former Great Eastern suburban network radiating out of London's Liverpool St terminus. The vast majority of services are operated by EMUs, of which GA has a fair variety of different classes. Norwich - London services were worked by Class 90 electrics until early 2020 and some trains between Norwich and Great Yarmouth or Lowestoft ran with DRS class 37 diesels until late 2019.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
6 photos
LNWR & West Midlands Rly

LNWR & West Midlands Rly

The West Midlands franchise is operated under two different banners; West Midlands Railway, primarily for local services around Birmingham, and London North Western Railway, primarily for longer distance services using the WCML from London to the West Midlands and north as far as Liverpool. The operator has a large fleet of DMUs and EMUs with most of the EMUs on LNWR services and most of the DMUs with WMR.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/26
55 photos
Mendip Rail

Mendip Rail

The rail operations of Foster Yeoman and Hanson (formerly ARC) were combined as Mendip Rail in 1993. The fleet consisted of 8 class 59 locomotives used to haul stone trains from Merehead and Whatley quarries to various destinations in southern England. EWS and then DB operated the trains after privatisation, using the 59s alongside their own locos, but the contract went to Freightliner in November 2019 together with the Mendip Rail Class 59s, which continue to be used as before.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/16
10 photos
Network Rail

Network Rail

Network Rail own and control the UK rail network but don't generally run trains. A significant exception to this are test trains, used to monitor the state of the track and identify potential defects before they become real problems. Some trains are powered by locomotives owned by freight operators, such as Colas or GBRf but Network Rail has a small fleet of locomotives, converted HSTs and DMUs.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/12
87 photos
ScotRail

ScotRail

ScotRail operates all passenger services that run entirely within Scotland plus a few local cross border services to Carlisle and Newcastle. The operator has a large fleet of EMUs and DMUs, which operate most services, but has recently acquired a number of shortened HST sets from FGW and uses a couple of DRS Class 68s on peak hour workings between Edinburgh and Fife.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
54 photos
South West Trains

South West Trains

South West Trains took over the operation of passenger services between London, Portsmouth, Southampton, Weymouth, Salisbury and Exeter, as well as the suburban network in south west London and neighbouring parts of the Home Counties, in February 1996. The new franchisee from mid 2017, South Western Railway is also covered here. The franchise operates a large fleet of 750V 3rd rail EMUs but also uses some DMUs, principally on the London - Salisbury - Exeter and Salisbury - Southampton routes.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
15 photos
Southern

Southern

Southern operates passenger services on the former Central division of the Southern Region, centred around the lines from London Bridge and Victoria to Brighton, including an extensive suburban network in South London and services to various South Coast destinations from Southampton in the west to Ore, near Hastings, in the east. The vast majority of services are operated by EMUs but Class 171 DMUs are used on a couple of unelectrified lines.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/22
14 photos
TransPennine Express

TransPennine Express

TransPennine Express operates long distance passenger services across the Pennines linking towns and cities in Lancashire to Yorkshire and the Humber. It's trains also operate on the ECML north of York to Newcastle and Edinburgh and on the WCML north of Preston to Glasgow and Edinburgh. The TPE fleet has been quite varied with several classes of EMU and DMU and it now has IETs and Class 68 locos as well.
v : T000
updated : 2020/04/27
32 photos
Virgin Trains

Virgin Trains

Virgin Trains operated services on the West Coast route from 1997 until late 2019 and also had the Cross Country franchise between 1997 and 2007. Virgin Trains East Coast (VTEC) and its successor LNER will be covered in their own gallery.
v : T000
updated : 2020/05/12
36 photos
VTEC/LNER

VTEC/LNER

Virgin Trains took over the East Coast franchise in 2015, only to hand it over to the government owned LNER just over 3 years later. Most of the pictures here were taken north of Edinburgh, meaning Class 91s don't appear but there are plenty of HSTs, as well as the occasional IET.
v : T000
php v : 1003     |     txt v : T000     |     pub : 2015/07/07