updated : 2017/03/10
276 photos
opencast coal mines

opencast coal mines

Steam worked opencast mines are the most incredible places to see and photograph steam locomotives, whether looking down from the rim at a dozen locos scurrying back and forth or getting in close at the coal face. Zhalainuo'er (Jalainur) lasted until 2009 and Sandaoling is still working in 2016, just.
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updated : 2017/03/10
400 photos
deep coal mines

deep coal mines

Deep coal mines provided employment for more steam locomotives than any other industry in China and that continues to the present day. Many mine systems included lines running through attractive countryside and interesting industrial architecture. Diesels on mine systems have not been ignored.
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updated : 2016/07/16
56 photos
forestry railways

forestry railways

The forests of north-east China were once home to hundreds of miles of narrow gauge forestry railways but most disappeared in the 1990s, leaving only a handful to see in the 21st Century. The last true steam worked forestry lines finished in 2003, leaving Huanan, by then only hauling coal, to cling on until 2010.
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updated : 2017/03/09
115 photos
sheds and workshops

sheds and workshops

Locomotive depots, servicing points and workshops can be very photogenic places providing a contrast to the photos of locomotives at work. In China most servicing was carried out in the open air, even in the frozen north in winter, and traditional sheds, as found in Britain, were rare on the national system or industrial lines. In workshops and sheds, where they existed, the lack of light was a challenge.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/12
43 photos
steelworks

steelworks

The steel industry was the third biggest employer of steam locomotives in China, after the national railways and the coal mines. Getting permission to visit steelworks was difficult but not impossible. They weren't the easiest photo locations either but could be very rewarding.
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