updated : 2016/07/14
77 photos
C2 Class NG 0-8-0

C2 Class NG 0-8-0

Most Chinese narrow gauge lines used 28 tonne 0-8-0 tender engines, usually known as C2s, and produced in quantity at Harbin and Shijiazhuang from 1958 to 1988. The design originated in Russia and some Chrzanow, Skoda and Mavag built locos ended up in China.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
17 photos
JF Class 2-8-2

JF Class 2-8-2

The JF Class 2-8-2 dates back to 1918 when ALCo supplied a batch 25 locos to the Japanese controlled South Manchuria Railway. The JF was built in quantity during the period of Japanese occupation and production continued after Liberation until 1957, by which time around 2000 locos had been built. Locos on the national system were still in use as shunters in the late 1980s but didn't last much longer. A few survived in industrial service until 2005.
v : T000
updated : 2017/03/10
272 photos
JS Class 2-8-2

JS Class 2-8-2

The JS Class 2-8-2 was designed as a main line freight locomotive, a development of the JF Class 2-8-2s introduced on the SMR in 1918. The JS was in production from 1957 to 1988 and over 1900 were built. A few remain in industrial service in 2016.
v : T000
updated : 2016/09/27
250 photos
QJ Class 2-10-2

QJ Class 2-10-2

The QJ Class 2-10-2 was a development of the Soviet LV Class, almost certainly based on the OR21 prototype that never went into production. Datong Works started building QJs in 1964 and over 4700 had been built by the time production ceased at the end of 1988. QJs worked main line freights all over China right through to the end of steam and were a common sight on passenger trains as well.
v : T000
updated : 2016/09/27
9 photos
RM Class 4-6-2

RM Class 4-6-2

The RM Class 4-6-2 was China's last steam passenger design, combining a Russian designed boiler with a rolling chassis based on that of the earlier SL6 Pacific. A total of 258 were built between 1958 and 1966 but, despite their relative youth, they were early victims to dieselisation with the last being withdrawn in 1990.
v : T000
updated : 2016/09/27
19 photos
SL6 Class 4-6-2

SL6 Class 4-6-2

The SL6 Class 4-6-2 was one a number of Pacific designs introduced during the Japanese occupation of Manchuria and production restarted in 1956 after the Liberation. Despite the SL6 being a much older design than the RM, they outlasted their younger cousins by a year with the last survivors working until 1991.
v : T000
updated : 2017/03/09
457 photos
SY Class 2-8-2

SY Class 2-8-2

The SY Class 2-8-2 has been China's standard industrial steam locomotive for the last few decades. Over 1800 were built between 1960 and 1999, to a design derived from a 1920s ALCo light Mikado. The SYs were versatile machines and handful remain in industrial service in 2016.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/13
9 photos
BJ Class diesels

BJ Class diesels

The BJ was a compact powerful B-B diesel-hydraulic design that differed from most hydraulics by using a medium speed engine. The class was built at Beijing Feb 7th Works between 1975 and 1991 and dominated passenger traffic around the capital during much of the 1980s. They were later cascaded to secondary lines before withdrawal. A few still survive in industrial use.
v : T000
updated : 2017/03/09
70 photos
DF4, DF4A, DF4B Class diesels

DF4, DF4A, DF4B Class diesels

All three classes are very closely related and are often lumped together as DF4 Class. It would not be an exaggeration to say that the DF4 dieselised China. It wasn't China's first diesel class but it was the first really successful class and well over 4000 DF4, DF4A and DF4B were built from 1969 to the mid 1990s. DF4s are becoming rare in main line service but some continue on industrial lines.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
17 photos
DF4C class diesels

DF4C class diesels

The DF4C was a development of the successful DF4B with a new, more angular bodystyle, a new blue livery and an uprated 16V240ZJC engine. They were quite common in northern China but rare in the south.
v : T000
updated : 2017/03/09
25 photos
DF4D Class diesels

DF4D Class diesels

The DF4D was the final iteration of the successful DF4 line and came in passenger and freight versions. The class was introduced in 1996 and many are still in use today, working freight and passenger trains on non-electrified lines.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
16 photos
DF5, DF5B, DF5D Class diesels

DF5, DF5B, DF5D Class diesels

The DF5 is a Co-Co diesel-electric for heavy shunting and trip working, powered by an 8-cylinder inline version of the engine used in the DF4. It comes in a number of variants and has found favour with the national railways and industrial operators.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
5 photos
DF7G Class diesels

DF7G Class diesels

The DF7G is a Co-Co diesel electric designed for heavy shunting and trip work and uses a 12-cylinder version of the engine used in the DF4 series, making it considerably more powerful than the similar looking DF5. Locos are in service with the national railways and various industrial users.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
9 photos
DF8 Class diesels

DF8 Class diesels

The DF8 Class Co-Co diesel-electric dates from the same period as the DF4B but it was around 36% more powerful, making it ideal for heavy freight haulage. Some went to the Wuhan area but most were based at Mudanjiang, working coal trains from Jixi and Qitaihe to Harbin.
v : T000
updated : 2017/03/10
10 photos
DF8B Class diesels

DF8B Class diesels

The DF8B was a development of the DF8 but lacked the good looks of its predecessor. The class was in production from 1997 and built at both Qishuyuan and Ziyang. It was a useful machine for heavy freight work, rated at 3680kW, and is still in widespread use on non-electrified lines. DF8Bs have now been displaced from the most demanding duties by new HXN3 and HXN5 diesels.
v : T000
updated : 2017/03/09
5 photos
DF11 Class diesels

DF11 Class diesels

The DF11 is a high powered Co-Co diesel-electric designed to haul fast passenger services on non-electrified lines. Extensions to the electrified network since the class was introduced in the early 1990s have deprived these diesels of much of the work they were intended for but they can still be found working passenger services on many secondary main lines.
v : T000
updated : 2016/09/27
5 photos
DFH3 Class diesels

DFH3 Class diesels

The DFH3 was a powerful twin-engined B-B diesel-hydraulic produced in the 1970s and 1980s and largely used to dieselise passenger trains in north-east China. They weren't the most reliable locomotives and were swept aside by the same tide of DF4s and electrification that finished off main line steam. Some went into industrial service but it's unlikely that any are still in use.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
5 photos
GKD1, GKD1A Class diesels

GKD1, GKD1A Class diesels

The GKD1 and GKD1A classes of diesel-electric locomotive are Bo-Bo hood units built for industrial use by Dalian Locomotive works. Power comes from a 6-cylinder inline version of the 240ZJ engine used in many classes including the DF4 family.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/17
4 photos
HXD3B/3C/3D Class 25kV AC electrics

HXD3B/3C/3D Class 25kV AC electrics

The HXD3B, HXD3C and HXD3D Co-Co electric locomotives were built at Dalian from 2008 as a joint venture with Bombardier. The 3 classes are intended for freight, mixed traffic and passenger work and have been produced in large quantities. They can be seen on electrified lines across China.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
4 photos
SS3 & SS3B Class 25kV AC electrics

SS3 & SS3B Class 25kV AC electrics

The SS3 and SS3B Co-Cos were built in large numbers from 1978 to 2006 as China's main line electrification programme gathered speed. Although primarily a freight locomotive with a maximum speed of 100km/h, SS3 and SS3Bs have also been used on passenger trains. They are still widespread in southern and western China.
v : T000
updated : 2017/03/09
4 photos
SS9, SS9G Class 25kV AC electrics

SS9, SS9G Class 25kV AC electrics

The SS9 and SS9G are high powered electric locomotives designed to haul fast passenger trains and introduced in 1998. Most of the class were built to a modified design between 2002 and 2006 and look quite different to their older cousins. Both variants can be found working from Beijing and in the north-east.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
5 photos
21E Class 1500V DC electrics

21E Class 1500V DC electrics

These locos were very similar, if not identical, to a large number of locos built by Skoda in the 1950s and 1960s for use on industrial railways in Eastern Europe and Russia. They are unusual in consisting of three separate 4-wheel units coupled together, eliminating the need for bogies and making them Bo'Bo'Bos.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
6 photos
ED85 Class 1500V DC electrics

ED85 Class 1500V DC electrics

The ED85s are probably the oldest locomotives in use in China today. The design dates back to the late 1920s and most of the survivors were built in the 1940s. They can still be found at work on the Fushun opencast mining system and, unusually for China, have worn at least four different liveries over the past 30 years.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
5 photos
EL1 & EL2 Class 1500V DC electrics

EL1 & EL2 Class 1500V DC electrics

The EL1s and EL2s were Bo+B'o+Bo and Bo+Bo electrics built by LEW in East Germany and widely used in Eastern Europe and Russia as well as China. The EL1s had 2-section bodies but the smaller EL2 had a single section body.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/17
5 photos
ZG150 & ZG100 1500V DC electrics

ZG150 & ZG100 1500V DC electrics

The ZG100 and ZG150 were the local equivalents of the EL1 and EL2 and came in two versions, the ZG150-1500, a 2-section Bo+B'o+Bo, and the ZG100-1500, a single section Bo+Bo. They had noticeably longer noses and shorter full height sections than the LEW locos.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
6 photos
narrow gauge electrics

narrow gauge electrics

Many industrial sites had their own narrow gauge electric railways, built to a variety of gauges, and there were a number of longer distance narrow gauge lines, usually at 762mm gauge. Locos came in all shapes, sizes and colours.
v : T000
updated : 2016/07/16
4 photos
NYJ1, NZJ1, NZJ2 Class diesel units

NYJ1, NZJ1, NZJ2 Class diesel units

China produced a number of diesel units in the 1990s, designed to speed up passenger services on key routes. They followed the British HST concept with permanently coupled power cars at each end of a set of coaches. After a few years most had gone, replaced by true high-speed electric units or locos and coaches.
v : T000
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